Three Signs It Is Time You Considered A Leased Line

Connectivity is an essential for most modern businesses. It is very rare that a company could survive without a good, stable internet connection. Those that could survive would find growth very difficult without this major resource being available.

For most people, internet means 'Broadband'. This is the standard connection, and is the lowest rung of the connectivity ladder. It suffers contention (more on this topic later), with a high possibility of faults or errors in operation, and suffers poor issue fix times.

After this, there are the 'Fibre' variants. FTTC, and more recently FTTP, are both ways of increasing your upload and download speeds, and both may work well for you.

 

1st Sign – You Require Guaranteed Upload And Download Speeds

Fibre and ADSL both suffer from unpredictable Upload and Download speeds. As your business grows and your usage grows correspondingly then the requirements you have from your connection will outreach what ADSL can supply. Fibre offers some improvement, but isn't the guaranteed solution some think.

The problem with 'Fibre' (and note that 'Fibre' is in inverted commas here) is that it isn't actually Fibre. Or, more accurately, it isn't an end to end Fibre connection.

The connection from you to your local street cabinet is still copper wire, and it is at this point that your connection will be throttled back. A good analogy might be a caravaning holiday (bear with me on this). Your car might be perfectly capable of travelling at 100 mph, but it isn't going to do that speed while towing a caravan. The caravan is limiting how fast your car can ultimately go. In the case of FTTC, your copper wire is the limiting factor. It doesn't actually matter how fast the 'Fibre' part of your connection is. Your speeds will still be limited by your 'caravan', the copper wire connecting your house or business to the BT cabinet.

ADSL suffers from the slowest speeds of all Connectivity options. As a consumer-grade option, it does not come with guaranteed issue-fix times, and is not suitable for supporting multiple users uploading and downloading data files. This problem will be compounded if you use a VoIP service for your telecoms.

 

2nd Sign – You Require A Service With Long-term Stability

Both ADSL and Fibre products also suffer from a problem termed 'Contention'. This means that, in essence, the more people around you, the lower your connection speeds will be.

The problem occurs due to the afore-mentioned BT cabinets. These little green boxes dot around our towns and cities, and make sure we all connect and remain connected to the public telephone network. It is this network that delivers internet connectivity – for most of us at least.

As more and more connections are needed, while neighbourhoods expand and houses are built, so this resource is shared between more and more users. As each new house is built, and new connection is requested and set up, so the original cabinet speed is 'shared' between additional users.

 

3rd Sign – Your Business Relies On Your Connection To Function And You Wish To Protect Against Possible Loss

This is the time when we 'get legal'. Neither ADSL or Fibre Connections provide a guarantee. If you look closely at an advert for ADSL or FTTC you will spot a small asterisk next to the speeds claimed. This asterisk relates to two very important words. The two words are “Up To”.

“Up To” covers the Provider in question, and means that the advertised speed is not necessarily the speed you will receive. The “Up To” speed given is just what it says – your speed will be anywhere up to the speed quoted. So if you have signed up for an “Up To” 50Mbps service, your Provider can provide a service anywhere between 0 and 50Mbps. This is one of the main disadvantages of using an ADSL connection for business – it is inherently unpredictable and unreliable.

FTTC is a more reliable service than ADSL, and is more suitable for business use, but still lacks an actual, legally binding guarantee that your service will not fall below a certain level. Providers are not required to deliver estimated speed predictions, and there are no legally binding penalties in place should the service fail to deliver what was promised.

 

The Solution – A Leased Line

So, bearing in mind the pitfalls of taking 'off the peg' solutions, there is another way – a Leased Line.

A Leased Line is a dedicated, end-to-end connection between your business and the national internet network.

It gives guaranteed Upload and Download speeds, and these are symmetrical, so you don't suffer from slower upload speeds than download speeds.

It also comes without the risk of Contention.
It also gives you legal redress should the service fall below the agreed speeds.

A Leased Line also comes with SLAs (Service Level Agreements), which gives financial compensation in the event of service disruption, and therefore some reassurance regarding your service level. If your connection falls below a certain speed for a set time duration, then you are entitled to some form of recompense. This functions as compensation for your loss of service, and also as a motivating factor for the Provider to ensure you receive what was advertised and signed up for.

If a customer requires a stable, high quality internet connection then we always recommend a Leased Line.

It gives the reassurance of a dedicated connection built solely for the customer, with specified service speeds.

It won't suffer contention, even if a new housing estate is built in between the customer and their exchange.

And it offers an SLA covering the customer should there be any issues.

 

Contact us if you wish to know more about a Leased Line for your business.

If you are considering internet connectivity, but are not ready for a Leased Line just yet, see our other connectivity products here.

Make The Best Use Of Your Internet Connection – Use VoIP

There can be very few companies who could operate without an internet connection.

 

Accountancy platforms, CRM systems and file-sharing websites have all become essential for modern businesses, and they all have one thing in common. They all rely on an internet connection.

 

As we are so reliant on our connection in order to work, it does lead onto one obvious conclusion.

 

Why not use it for your phone calls as well?

 

VoIP has progressed from a low cost substitute for 'ordinary' phone calls. It offers a cost effective alternative with increased functionality over a traditional phone system.

There is nothing to lose, and a lot to gain, from your company switching over to using VoIP.

 

And one of the biggest gains is to use one of your resources to its fullest.

 

If you are one of the forward-thinking people who have invested in a future-proof internet connection, why not use this resource to its maximum capacity?Along with maximising the ROI on your internet provision, VoIP allows a variety of other positives.

 

Your workers don't need to be based in one central office. In fact, your workers don't need to be based in an office at all.

 

As the phone system now lives 'in the cloud', it doesn't matter where users are physically located. As long as people have an internet connection, they can connect to their business phone system. Rather than using other means or methods to get in touch (calling from their home phone, calling from personal mobiles, putting messages in bottles), employees simply log in from wherever they are, and use the company's VoIP service.

 

This in turn leads to an interesting question – do you need an office at all? This is the ultimate extension of the remote working idea. If you don't actually need an office, why pay for an unnecessary expense? There are more and more companies who are working from a 'virtual' office. Workers are based in different physical locations, but using the same phone system. They can transfer calls seamlessly between each other, dial out displaying the company number, and receive calls to the company number. Calls will route in exactly the same way. Menu Auto-attendants and Music on Hold will all function as normal.

 

Callers will have no idea that their call has not gone through to an ordinary office. Their call will be transferred to the most appropriate person. The company's official audio greeting messages and Music will play as normal. The only difference is that your 'office' exists virtually, using the internet.

 

As just about everyone needs the internet (at home or on the move), why not use it to its best advantage? Get in touch to discuss the possibility of revolutionising the way you work.

 

More on our VoIP solutions

More on how we can help with your internet connection

 

VoIP Optimised Broadband update

Dear all,

Just a quick update to let you know where we are with our broadband roll out. We’ve been working with Fluidata SEP to get our own platform, interconnects, resilience and quality right before releasing the final services. We’re very happy with the result. Right now we have some BT Wholesale ADSL (for VoIP only IPv6 broadband), LLU ADSL (which will be our unlimited data product) and BT Fibre to the Cabinet (FTTC) live and in use with select customers and SureVoIP Partners. We also have some Ethernet Fibre products about to go live with customers.

It’s all just about there and is currently in the final stages. What’s left is Quality Of Service (QoS) testing for VoIP/SIP, integration with the SureVoIP API for SureVoIP Partners and our own use and a Broadband Checker for the main website. It’s taken a long time, but doing things right always does. Much better than us just adding a margin on to someone else’s internet connectivity products, where as this way we have lots of control and your traffic comes straight in to the SureVoIP Network.

The new customer portal is also making excellent progress which will be available for Beta usage next month, all going well. More when we have it.

Thanks as always,

Gavin.