Make The Best Use Of Your Internet Connection – Use VoIP

There can be very few companies who could operate without an internet connection.

 

Accountancy platforms, CRM systems and file-sharing websites have all become essential for modern businesses, and they all have one thing in common. They all rely on an internet connection.

 

As we are so reliant on our connection in order to work, it does lead onto one obvious conclusion.

 

Why not use it for your phone calls as well?

 

VoIP has progressed from a low cost substitute for 'ordinary' phone calls. It offers a cost effective alternative with increased functionality over a traditional phone system.

There is nothing to lose, and a lot to gain, from your company switching over to using VoIP.

 

And one of the biggest gains is to use one of your resources to its fullest.

 

If you are one of the forward-thinking people who have invested in a future-proof internet connection, why not use this resource to its maximum capacity?Along with maximising the ROI on your internet provision, VoIP allows a variety of other positives.

 

Your workers don't need to be based in one central office. In fact, your workers don't need to be based in an office at all.

 

As the phone system now lives 'in the cloud', it doesn't matter where users are physically located. As long as people have an internet connection, they can connect to their business phone system. Rather than using other means or methods to get in touch (calling from their home phone, calling from personal mobiles, putting messages in bottles), employees simply log in from wherever they are, and use the company's VoIP service.

 

This in turn leads to an interesting question – do you need an office at all? This is the ultimate extension of the remote working idea. If you don't actually need an office, why pay for an unnecessary expense? There are more and more companies who are working from a 'virtual' office. Workers are based in different physical locations, but using the same phone system. They can transfer calls seamlessly between each other, dial out displaying the company number, and receive calls to the company number. Calls will route in exactly the same way. Menu Auto-attendants and Music on Hold will all function as normal.

 

Callers will have no idea that their call has not gone through to an ordinary office. Their call will be transferred to the most appropriate person. The company's official audio greeting messages and Music will play as normal. The only difference is that your 'office' exists virtually, using the internet.

 

As just about everyone needs the internet (at home or on the move), why not use it to its best advantage? Get in touch to discuss the possibility of revolutionising the way you work.

 

More on our VoIP solutions

More on how we can help with your internet connection

 

Realising and accepting that you may just be an entrepreneur

Gavin Henry, managing director of SureVoIP, will be speaking at the Granite Expo Seminar at 11:15 on Thursday 27th October (SureVoIP also have a stand at the Expo, so why not come along and say hi!). The talk details are below.

 

Realising and accepting that you may just be an entrepreneur:

Gavin will guide you through his 30-year journey spanning various events, decisions and “lucky chances” that have helped shape his path to running his own successful business. It’s easy to put achievements down to just luck, being in the right place at the right time or about who you know. Well, it's exactly all of the above.

This is an honest account of how little things can add up to something sustainable and highly enjoyable. Hopefully if you are thinking about starting a business, already own a start-up or an established company then you might gain some valuable insight – or at least identify with the feeling that the term “entrepreneur” does not apply to you, when in fact it really does.

When Gavin’s Dad died on Valentine’s Day this year, he thought back over his experiences to date and realised the importance of all the little things that had got him here today. Hopefully others will relate to this message and understand that they too can take that all-important step.

This talk originates from Gavin having been named as one of Scotland's top 40 entrepreneurs under the age of 40 and being invited to give a talk for 3rd Year pupils on Entrepreneurs Day at Ellon Academy in November 2016.

Gavin's company, SureVoIP, is regularly recognised as one of the best telecoms companies in Scotland and in the UK, most recently receiving nominations for two awards in the prestigious Comms National Awards 2016. The business also won the Best Business ITSP (Medium Enterprise) UK-wide honour in May 2016.

The Granite Expo audience will be the dry run so Gavin hopes it's of value to those listening, because in his words: “I'm not really an entrepreneur, I just have a passion for what I do.”

03 Or Not 03: A Guide To Your UK Number Options

You may have noticed a creeping trend towards companies advertising 03 numbers, rather than a traditional UK number (one that starts with 01 or 02).

This blog article aims to guide you through the differences between these numbers, and help you decide which may be best for your company.

An 03 number is a UK telephone number (beginning with the numbers '03'), which isn't tied to any geographic area. They have been introduced in order to give transparency as to call costs, and to provide callers with an alternative to costly 084 and 087 numbers. 084 and 087 numbers can come with a hefty price per minute charge per call. These numbers are income generating for the company which provides it. If you call a company on a number beginning 084 or 087, you will be charged a per minute cost which gives income to that company or organisation (or their telephone company).

Dialling an 03 number costs no more than a standard land-line call, and is included in mobile providers' standard tariffs. For some time, the telecoms industry has been putting steady pressure on number-holders to move away from 084 and 087 numbers. They have a bad reputation regarding possible costs per call, and callers are rightly wary about calling them. Telecoms companies, and companies which advertise these numbers, are coming under increasing pressure to use an 03 number instead.

An 03 number works in many scenarios, and can be a better option than a standard 'geographic' number (one beginning 01 or 02). It can work well if you don't wish to advertise a specific location, but rather a nation-wide presence. If your company sells to all areas of the country, it may well work to your advantage to advertise a national 0330 number.

The reverse is also true. If you deal mainly with a local market, the familiarity of a local area code could well be reassuring to customers.

So, the conclusion is, work out who you wish your numbers to appeal to. If you wish to create a national presence, not tied to any one area, then an 03 number could be just what you are looking for. If you deal with a predominantly local market, who wish to deal with a local company, then a telephone number with this area code could well be the best option.

Guide to 03 numbers

Number

Purpose

0330, 0333

Standard phone number for any purpose. Not linked to a specific geographic area.

0300, 0303

For charity or not-for-profit use only.

0343, 0344, 0345, 0370, 0371, 0372

For companies to migrate existing 08 equivalent number to. Customers can call a similar number to the one the company has advertised previously but without the associated costs.

If you wish to discuss any of the above in detail, just get in touch.

If you wish to see the telephone numbers we can offer in your local area, please visit our home page and use our number search function.

See more on Ofcom's regulations regarding 08 numbers.

SureVoIP offers 0330 numbers for free, let us know if you would like to try one out for your business. We offer many telephone numbers from our Ofcom number ranges. Why not ask and see if we can assist you?

 

Adrift In A Sea of Acronyms

The IT industry is notorious for using acronyms. Many people not involved may be confused by them. Random strings of letters march through web-pages in three and four letter sequences, striking fear and confusion in the hearts of us 'non-techys'.

I've decided I will represent us, the ordinary folk, and in this vein I present this short guide to what these dyslexic sequences actually mean.

As you are on the SureVoIP website, I suppose I should start with VoIP.

VoIP – stands for Voice over Internet Protocol. This is the technology which allows voice services to be delivered using the internet. Rather than calls being delivered through traditional phone lines, a VoIP service delivers an upgraded telephony service using an internet connection rather than a copper phone line.

One down! Lets move from VoIP to SIP. Those enquiring or specifying a VoIP service will probably have heard of this one, but I doubt if many know what it actually means.

SIP – stands for Session Initiation Protocol. This is the 'language' which VoIP speaks. VoIP equipment must use this language in order to speak to other VoIP equipment, so they can understand each other. Think of it as a bit like moving to Spain. In order to buy your shopping or order in a restaurant, you need to speak Spanish (not the best analogy but bear with me). If you don't speak the correct language, you won't get far. Likewise, if your phones don't speak the correct VoIP language, they simply won't work.

Our next acronym will be familiar to those who operate or are thinking of operating there own phone system on their premises. Lets look at PBX.

PBX – stands for Private Branch eXchange. In the context of those with their own equipment, this means a piece of hardware somewhere on the premises which is responsible for making and receiving telephone calls. Gets a bit more confusing when it refers to 'Hosted PBX'. This will refer to a VoIP system (see above).

Our next set of initials is ITSP. It relate to telephony, and SureVoIP is one! Let's see what it means.

ITSP – stands for Internet Telephony Service Provider. Quite simply, a telephony provider which delivers your phone calls using VoIP.

The next two are possibly familiar to all, DDI and PTSN. They both refer to traditional telecoms.

DDI – stands for Direct Dial In. Quite simply, the phone number which people have to dial to reach you directly. In an office environment, this means the number to call your own desk phone, as opposed to reaching your company switchboard.

PSTN – stands for Public Switch Telephone Network. The collective name for the interconnected series of networks which link mobile, landline and VoIP phones to each other. It is this which allows you to call a landline from your mobile, or a VoIP phone from a traditional landline. 

I hope this brief explanation has given you some insight into the world of IT. If we can be of any further help, whether it is for clearing up any more acronym confusion, or discussing what VoIP can do, just contact us and let us know.